Larry Page hints at Motorola’s upcoming smartphones

During its quarterly earnings call, Google CEO Larry Page hinted at the kind of smartphones we can expect Motorola to launch in the future. The company, which is still launching smartphones that were planned before Google’s acquisition of Motorola, is looking at three core areas, which could be the pitch for its rumored X-Phone that is expected to be announced at this year’s Google I/O in May.

“In today’s multi screen world, the opportunities are endless. Think about your device. Battery life is a huge issue. You shouldn’t have to worry about constantly recharging your phone. When you drop your phone, it shouldn’t go splat. Everything should be a ton faster and easier.  There’s real potential to invent new and better experiences,” Page said in his prepared remarks.

Google maintains that it is still early days for Motorola after its acquisition last year. Google had not only acquired the company but also its 12-18 months of product pipeline that it is still has to work through. However, Page is pretty excited about future prospects with the company. “Our CEO at Motorola, Dennis, has built a world-class team, and they’re working on these opportunities. It’s still early days, but I am excited about the innovative way they’re approaching product development and the speed of their execution,” he said.

But the highlight of Page’s prepared remarks was his description of the current situation with devices and how they are changing our lives.

We now live in a multi-screen world. People carry a supercomputer in their pocket all the time. In fact we feel naked without our smartphone! And many users have more than one device … a laptop, a phone, and a tablet.

We’re living in uncharted territory. It’s a new kind of computing environment. Everyone is really excited about our technology and spending a lot of money on devices, driving faster adoption than we have ever seen before.

It’s been a long time in computing since we have had this rate of change — it probably hasn’t happened since the birth of personal computing.

- Larry Page, CEO, Google