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> > Asus, Dell, Lenovo Chromebooks with stable OS to support Google Play Store

Asus, Dell, Lenovo Chromebooks with stable OS to support Google Play Store

Three new models running Chrome OS stable version will now get access to Android apps.

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Earlier this year, Google promised that all Chromebooks launched this year onwards will support Android apps, and now the company appears to fulfill that. Until now, Google offered support for Play Store only in Chrome OS Beta Channel. However, starting today, three Chromebook models running stable version of Chrome OS will also be able to access the app store.

Models from Asus, Dell, and Lenovo running Chrome OS will be able to access Play Store for Android apps. These models include the ASUS Chromebook Flip C302, Dell Chromebook 3189, Lenovo Chromebook N22, and Lenovo IdeaPad N42 Chromebook, Android Police notes.

These models are expected to be targeted at schools and educational institutes. Powered by Intel Braswell processors, these laptops are built with features such as spill-resistant keyboards, reinforced ports, and a sealed touchpad – components likely to sustain damage during rough usage at the hands of children. ALSO READ: Asus Chromebook Flip C213 with 360-degree flippable display launched: Specifications, features

Chromebooks are considered an affordable and sturdier alternative to Windows laptops. At the Google I/O 2017, the company held a dedicated session for developers to focus on designing apps for large screen devices such as tablets and Chromebook. The focus towards building apps for these devices is said to provide ‘early adopters’ the opportunity to lead and influence Android apps ecosystem, subsequently setting the standard for apps on tablet and Chromebooks.

Meanwhile, the market share of Chrome OS is overtaking that of Apple iOS and MacOS in the US K-12 market. According to a data from Futuresource Consulting, Chrome OS managed to grow 58 percent market share in 2016 up from 50 percent a year before, while iOS dropped to 14 percent, down from 19 percent in 2015, and macOS dropped to five percent, down from six percent. ALSO READ: Xolo Chromebook review: Handy device for enterprises