comscore
News

Google Chrome 68 starts marking non-HTTPS websites as 'not secure'

Starting today, Google Chrome 68 for desktops will start marking all plain HTTP sites as “not secure”.

  • Published: July 24, 2018 5:13 PM IST
chromebook-google-dell

Earlier this year, Google announced that it will launch Chrome 68 in July, and with that, it will mark all websites that do not use the HTTPS encryption as “not secure”, even if they don’t handle sensitive data/ communications/ information.

Starting today, in its effort to move internet users to a more secure web, Google Chrome 68 for desktops will start marking all plain HTTP sites as “not secure”. With this, Google is trying to keep HTTPS as the default protocol for secure information. The omnibox on the top in Chrome 68 will display the “not secure” message for all HTTP pages, instead of the small ‘i’ icon.

HTTPS stands for Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure. It is a technology that ensures secure communication over a computer network, widely used on the Internet. In HTTPS, information is encrypted using Transport Layer Security (TLS), advanced level of Secure Sockets Layer (SSL).

As previously described by Chrome Security Product Manager, Emily Schechter in a blog, 81 out of the top 100 sites on the web use HTTPS by default, and over 68 percent of Chrome traffic on both Android and Windows is now protected, while over 78 percent of Chrome traffic on both Chrome OS and Mac is now protected with the secure encryption.

“Chrome’s new interface will help users understand that all HTTP sites are not secure, and continue to move the web towards a secure HTTPS web by default,” noted Schechter.

Watch video: Honor 9N First Look

Google started HTTP crackdown in January 2017 with the release of Chrome 56. However, it started labeling only those HTTP pages “not secure” that collect passwords or credit cards. Now with the Google Chrome 68, the labeling will extend to a larger chunk of HTTP websites.

  • Published Date: July 24, 2018 5:13 PM IST