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Intel 9th generation processors may have soldered heat spreader for better thermal efficiency

This comes right after it was revealed that Intel may be looking to remove hyper-threading support from its upcoming 9th generation Core i7 chips.

  • Published: July 27, 2018 1:15 PM IST
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A number of reports have emerged on the internet detailing some information about the upcoming, 9th generation of Intel processors. According to the latest round of information, it looks like Intel will solder its heat spreader on its 8-core, Core i9 chips to increase the thermal efficiency on its next-generation chips. As pointed by a report from German website Golem, soldering the chips is likely to increase the thermal capacity of the processors allowing the company to ship devices which can achieve up to 5GHz.

The report about the soldered integrated heat spreader (IHS) comes right after it was revealed that the company may be looking to remove hyper-threading support from its upcoming 9th generation Core i7 chips. It is likely that the soldered IHS will result in better cooling of the processor along with higher clock speeds. One thing to note here is that this soldered IHS will only be available on the Core i7-9700K processor along with the Core i9-9900K which confirm the information that the company will only apply the IHS in its eight-core processors.

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Higher and long sustained clock speeds along with better cooling are likely to attract a number of PC gamers, and modders who are interested in creating machines that are best in the market while pushing the system to its limits. To clarify, chip makers have traditionally applied a thermally conductive compound on the actual processor so the heat generated from the chip can be dissipated on the metal fin on the top of the chip.

Intel started applying thermal grease with Ivy Bridge in 2012. This resulted in increased temperatures when it came the heat generated by its chips prompting users to ‘delid’ the chips to apply their own IHS. Before that with Sandy Bridge, Intel used to solder the IHS on its chips. This new report comes days after it was revealed that Intel may be planning to drop hyper-treading support from its future Core i7 processors.

Instead of focusing on the more number of total threads on a CPU, the company is focusing on increasing the clock speed of all the cores present on the processor. It is likely to compensate for the reduced threads with more powerful cores.

  • Published Date: July 27, 2018 1:15 PM IST