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ISRO’s GSLV MkIII-D2 places GSAT-29, India’s heaviest satellite, into Geostationary Transfer Orbit

The GSAT-29 is a communication satellite with a designated lifespan of 10 years.

  • Published: November 15, 2018 10:51 AM IST
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Image Credit: ISRO


Marking another achievement for the country’s space agency, ISRO’s GSLV MkIII-D2 successfully placed the GSAT-29, India’s heaviest-ever satellite, into a Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO) on Wednesday.

The MkIII-D2, a fifth-generation Geostationary Satellite Launch Vehicle, lifted off from Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, placing the GSAT-29 in orbit after a flight of 17 minutes.

“India has achieved significant milestone with our heaviest launcher lifting off the heaviest satellite from the Indian soil. The launch vehicle has precisely placed the satellite in its intended orbit. I congratulate entire ISRO team for this achievement,” ISRO chairman K Sivan was quoted as saying in a report.

Weighing about 3423kg, GSAT-29 is a communication satellite with a designated lifespan of 10 years. According to ISRO, the satellite carries Ka/Ku-band high throughput communication transponders intended to meet the communication requirements of users, including those in remote areas. In addition, several new technologies such as Q/V-band payload, data transmission through optical communication link are there.

Talking about the carrier, GSLV MkIII-D2 is a three-stage heavy launch vehicle developed by the Indian Space Research Organization. It has two solid propellants for the first stage, a liquid propellant for the second stage, and a cryogenic propellant for the third stage.

GSLV MkIII is designed to carry satellites up to four tons in weight and placing them into Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO), or satellites up to ten tons in weight and placing them into Low Earth Orbit (LEO). This is twice the capability of the earlier GSLV MkII.

(With inputs from PTI)

  • Published Date: November 15, 2018 10:51 AM IST